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Memento Mori
Memento Mori

The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
-Julius Caesar (Shakespeare)

This blog is for the ones who lived before they died and everything that makes me feel alive.

Questions?
7:00 PM
March 9th, 2012
-Spoken by Anne Hutchinson at her trial, before she was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony


-Spoken by Anne Hutchinson at her trial, before she was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony

4:00 PM
March 5th, 2012
fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

You see that handsome son of a gun in the center of the photo? Yeah, that one with the medal and the mustache. That is Anibal Augusto Milhais (July 9, 1895 - June 3, 1970), also known as “Soldado Milhões”, which means “A soldier as good as a million others”. Already, we can tell that this man is a bad ass.
Milhais was the most decorated Portuguese soldier of WWI and the only Portuguese soldier to be awarded the Ordem de Torre e Espada do Valor, Lealdade e Mérito (Military order of the Tower and of the Sword, of Valour, Loyalty, and Merit) on the battlefield (they were awarded in the capital of Lisbon). Why did he get these awards? Keep reading.
Milhais was a farmer until he got drafted in 1915. He was mobilized in 1917 and sent off to France to fight on the front lines that same year. It was in the Battle of La Lys on April 9, 1918 (First day of Ludendorff’s Lys Offensive, “Operation Georgette”, and/or “Battle of Estaires”) that Milhais was put in charge of one of the Lewis machine guns and covered the withdrawal of Portuguese and Scottish soldiers by himself. He tricked the attacking Germans that they were up against a well defended unit instead of one armed Portuguese soldier with a machine gun.
The Germans went around him and Milhais was stuck behind them for three days with nothing but a bag of sweetened almonds for food. On his third day, he rescued a Scottish major from drowning in a swamp and they both made it back to Allied lines. Milhais didn’t tell anyone what he did, but the Scottish major included it in his reports, as did other soldiers. A few months later, Milhais, again with his Lewis machine gun, held off a German attack and allowed a Belgium unit retreat to the safety of a secondary trench. On July 15, 1918, a praise given by Major Ferreira do Amaral to Milhais was published by the Order of Service of the Battalion, saying that his (Milhais’s) action as having been worth a million men.
He’s a bad-ass Portuguese WWI hero with a bitchin’ mustache. I haven’t see him here before and thought that he needed a mention.

He’s amazing. 


fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

You see that handsome son of a gun in the center of the photo? Yeah, that one with the medal and the mustache. That is Anibal Augusto Milhais (July 9, 1895 - June 3, 1970), also known as “Soldado Milhões”, which means “A soldier as good as a million others”. Already, we can tell that this man is a bad ass.

Milhais was the most decorated Portuguese soldier of WWI and the only Portuguese soldier to be awarded the Ordem de Torre e Espada do Valor, Lealdade e Mérito (Military order of the Tower and of the Sword, of Valour, Loyalty, and Merit) on the battlefield (they were awarded in the capital of Lisbon). Why did he get these awards? Keep reading.

Milhais was a farmer until he got drafted in 1915. He was mobilized in 1917 and sent off to France to fight on the front lines that same year. It was in the Battle of La Lys on April 9, 1918 (First day of Ludendorff’s Lys Offensive, “Operation Georgette”, and/or “Battle of Estaires”) that Milhais was put in charge of one of the Lewis machine guns and covered the withdrawal of Portuguese and Scottish soldiers by himself. He tricked the attacking Germans that they were up against a well defended unit instead of one armed Portuguese soldier with a machine gun.

The Germans went around him and Milhais was stuck behind them for three days with nothing but a bag of sweetened almonds for food. On his third day, he rescued a Scottish major from drowning in a swamp and they both made it back to Allied lines. Milhais didn’t tell anyone what he did, but the Scottish major included it in his reports, as did other soldiers. A few months later, Milhais, again with his Lewis machine gun, held off a German attack and allowed a Belgium unit retreat to the safety of a secondary trench. On July 15, 1918, a praise given by Major Ferreira do Amaral to Milhais was published by the Order of Service of the Battalion, saying that his (Milhais’s) action as having been worth a million men.

He’s a bad-ass Portuguese WWI hero with a bitchin’ mustache. I haven’t see him here before and thought that he needed a mention.

He’s amazing. 

8:02 AM
March 5th, 2012
lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 
Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.
Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.
Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”
Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.
Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”
Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”
Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.
Image (via World War II Database)
Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

Inspiration to Asian-American women everywhere!


lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 

Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.

Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.

Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”

Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.

Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”

Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”

Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.

Image (via World War II Database)

Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

Inspiration to Asian-American women everywhere!

(via fuckyeahhistorycrushes)

4:04 PM
March 4th, 2012
fabulouswomen:

Sophie Scholl (9 May 1921 – 22 February 1943) was a German student, active within the White Rose non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany. She was convicted of high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich with her brother Hans. As a result, they were both executed by guillotine.
I am, now as before, of the opinion that I did the best that I could do for my nation. I therefore do not regret my conduct and will bear the consequences that result from my conduct.


fabulouswomen:

Sophie Scholl (9 May 1921 – 22 February 1943) was a German student, active within the White Rose non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany. She was convicted of high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich with her brother Hans. As a result, they were both executed by guillotine.

I am, now as before, of the opinion that I did the best that I could do for my nation. I therefore do not regret my conduct and will bear the consequences that result from my conduct.

(Source: , via )

8:03 AM
March 4th, 2012

These stamps are glorious. Roald Dahl is one of my favourite childhood authors. But especially I love his spine-chillers. He has simply the best black humor.

wickedly dark humor galore. 


These stamps are glorious. Roald Dahl is one of my favourite childhood authors. But especially I love his spine-chillers. He has simply the best black humor.

wickedly dark humor galore. 

(Source: royalmail.com, via madamesommersprosse)

4:04 PM
March 3rd, 2012
cacophonism:


Surrealists: Man Ray, Jean Arp, Yves Tanguy, André Breton; Tristan Tzara, Salvador Dalí, Paul Eluard, Max Ernst and Rene Clevel, 1930.


I love you guys but why is Rene Margritte not here? 


cacophonism:

Surrealists: Man Ray, Jean Arp, Yves Tanguy, André Breton; Tristan Tzara, Salvador Dalí, Paul Eluard, Max Ernst and Rene Clevel, 1930.

I love you guys but why is Rene Margritte not here? 

(Source: divinedali, via mizenscen)

8:05 AM
March 3rd, 2012
madamesommersprosse:

(via A CUP OF JO)

I have that book!


madamesommersprosse:

(via A CUP OF JO)

I have that book!

4:03 PM
March 2nd, 2012
fuckyeahgothiccathedrals:

St Petri, Malmö, Sweden (1319)

I like the dignified luxury of this church. 


fuckyeahgothiccathedrals:

St Petri, Malmö, Sweden (1319)

I like the dignified luxury of this church. 

(via swedishhistory)

8:02 AM
March 2nd, 2012
woodendreams:

(by Roaming the World)

Where is this beautiful monstrosity and is it open to the public?


woodendreams:

(by Roaming the World)

Where is this beautiful monstrosity and is it open to the public?

4:04 PM
March 1st, 2012
historical-nonfiction:

That stiff man with the stork is actually one of the most revered British generals from WWI. He was so good he got a Viscountcy. Edmund Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby, first experienced combat in the Boer War. There, he became completely contemptous of the established command system. This contempt got him banished during WWI to the Middle East. Ironically, this was the making of his career. Allenby quickly gained the respect of the troops of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force by moving his HQ to a position closer to the front and visiting the troops regularly in the frontlines. He reorganized the EEF into an effective Corps system and imposing discipline and professionalism on the whole command.  He also gave financial support to T.E. Lawrence’s efforts to unite the Arabs in revolt against their Ottoman overlords. It is even believed that one of his victories was a prelude to the Blitzkrieg that would prove so effective in WWII. All in all, a pretty cool guy.

I read about him when we were studying WWI. 


historical-nonfiction:

That stiff man with the stork is actually one of the most revered British generals from WWI. He was so good he got a Viscountcy. Edmund Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby, first experienced combat in the Boer War. There, he became completely contemptous of the established command system. This contempt got him banished during WWI to the Middle East. Ironically, this was the making of his career. Allenby quickly gained the respect of the troops of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force by moving his HQ to a position closer to the front and visiting the troops regularly in the frontlines. He reorganized the EEF into an effective Corps system and imposing discipline and professionalism on the whole command.  He also gave financial support to T.E. Lawrence’s efforts to unite the Arabs in revolt against their Ottoman overlords. It is even believed that one of his victories was a prelude to the Blitzkrieg that would prove so effective in WWII. All in all, a pretty cool guy.

I read about him when we were studying WWI.